Archive for the ‘Vaccines’ Category

Flu Vaccine 2017

Sunday, October 1, 2017 // Blog, Flu, Prevention, Vaccines

Information for 2017-2018

Getting an annual flu vaccine is the first and best way to protect yourself and your family from the flu. Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations. The more people who get vaccinated, the more people will be protected from flu, including older people, very young children, pregnant women and people with certain health conditions who are more vulnerable to serious flu complications. This page summarizes information for the 2017-2018 flu season.

What viruses will the 2017-2018 flu vaccines protect against?

There are many flu viruses, and they are constantly changing. The composition of U.S. flu vaccines is reviewed annually and updated to match circulating flu viruses. Flu vaccines protect against the three or four viruses that research suggests will be most common. For 2017-2018, three-component vaccines are recommended to contain:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like (B/Victoria lineage) virus

Four-component vaccines, which protect against a second lineage of B viruses, are recommended to be produced using the same viruses recommended for the trivalent vaccines, as well as a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like (B/Yamagata lineage) virus.

We will be giving the Quadrivalent Flu Vaccine this fall.  A high dose vaccine will be available for those 65 and over.  It is marginally more effective and does not appear to have any greater risk of side effects.  If you have a scheduled appointment this fall, we will give it then.  Otherwise, you can call to schedule an appointment.  The optimal time is late October and early November.  Think pumpkins when thinking of the optimal time.  It is readily available, so if it is more convenient for you to get it at your pharmacy, work or school, it is fine to get it there.

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Words written in italic are directly from Mark L. Thornton, M.D., F.A.C.P.

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Flu Vaccine

Wednesday, December 16, 2015 // Flu, Vaccines

Everyone over the age of 6 months should get the flu vaccine. It used to be so simple; there was just one flu vaccine.  Now we have high dose, trivalent, quadrivalent, intranasal and intradermal, to name a few.  Here is a list of the vaccines available and their indications:

flu-vaccine

To avoid ordering multiple types of flu vaccine we have chosen the vaccine that would suit the needs of the majority of our patients, the standard dose trivalent vaccine.  Some patients have asked about the high dose vaccine–it contains much more antigen than the standard dose, but studies so far show that it is no more effective, or may be only marginally better, depending on which study one reads.

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New Pneumonia Vaccine Guidelines for Patients Over 65

Friday, January 23, 2015 // News, Vaccines

These recommendations have been in the works for a long time. What the CDC didn’t mention is that Medicare hasn’t decided whether to pay for the PCV13 vaccine or not. Patients anxious to get the vaccine are getting confusing information from pharmacies. Some are trying to give them the PPSV23 when the ask for the PCV13 which goes by the brand name Prevnar. Until the dust settles, I’m not ordering any.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13,Prevnar) and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23,Pneumovax) should be routinely administered in series to all adults who are at least 65 years of age, the CDC announced last week.

Adults in this age group who have not previously received a pneumococcal vaccine or who do not know their vaccination history should receive a dose of PCV13, followed by a dose of PPSV23 6 to 12 months later. The 2 vaccines should not be administered together, and the minimum acceptable interval between them is 8 weeks, the ACIP said.

Adults in this age group who have previously received 1 or more doses of PPSV23 should receive a dose of PCV13 if they not already done so. This dose should be given at least 1 year after the most recent PPSV23 dose was received. Patients in whom another dose of PPSV23 is indicated should receive it 6 to 12 months after PCV13 and 5 or more years after the most recent dose of PPSV23.

The recommendations were published in the Sept. 19 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly.

 

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